Looking along a long straight road amidst lush green farmland
small image motorcycle loaded up with touring gear Home Contribute Contact BAT Chit-Chat BAT Facebook Page BAT Stickers! Ren's Biking Blog Sharon's Biking Blog Guest Posts Bike Reviews Bike Gear Reviews Bike Tips Travel Stories Travel Tips Repair And Restoration Interesting Links Support BAT

Posts And Comments

The home page only lists the latest 10 posts. This page lists them all at 50 posts per page. This is just a tool to allow you to catch up on any posts you might have missed - that's all.


Moto Winch Anyone? Bob said :-
Listen out for a clacking sound from the right hand side of the engine between 5K and 6K RPM - that's the camchain. On the black KLX in the picture above the camchain was dead when I bought it, with only 10K miles on the clock. I changed the camchain and fitted the manual tensioner. On my green KLX it came to me with a slight camchain rattle at only 1600 miles, I'd caught it in time so a manual tensioner has fixed that one without needing a new chain.
It seems most people ride round on them oblivious to the the camchain flapping around!
I think the problem is because for some reason Kawasaki fitted a non-ratcheting secondary tensioner in the crankcase and I believe that the spring in the secondary tensioner takes up the slack in the camchain which would normally be taken up by the ratcheting main tensioner.
Since fitting and tensioning the manual tensioner I've not had to adjust it again in 2500 odd miles.

KTMs aren't unreliable particularly (anecdotal evidence suggests the odd electrical gremlin on the Indian built models), but they don't have the longevity built in. BMWs most powerful single, the XCountry made 54HP from 650CC, KTM push over 70HP from their 701CC single, it's in a very high state of tune and hence it simply won't last as long.
I think KTM recommend a new crankshaft every 40K miles in some of their bikes.
I suppose if you pretend you're buying a 2 Stroke and therefore expect searing performance and regular rebuilds then a KTM will fit the bill.

Scooter Cannonball 2012 Ren - The Ed said :-
Yeah when we think scooter we think 50cc rev-n-rips that you got when you were 16. We've never really embraced the scooter here in the UK unlike say Italy and around the Med. Even BMW have a couple of large capacity Scoots but you'd be hard pushed to see one here in Blighty.

Moto Winch Anyone? Ren - The Ed said :-
I'll keep an eye on Sharon's camchain tensioner Bob, I've seen a few reports that on the KLX at least they're a little weak.

Are KTMs unreliable? I don't hear too many gripes about the bigger 4 strokes, I know nothing about the smaller capacity bikes though.

Dammit Ian! Here's me thinking I'd invented something. The exhaust bit wouldn't work for lifting the bike as the bike really ought not to be running on it's side. I suppose you could blow it up with your mouth...

Ah well...back to the drawing board.


Moto Winch Anyone? Bob said :-
Well I've seen it all now....

Moto Winch Anyone? Ian Soady said :-
Ren: "I'm thinking of some sort of fold up bag that you place under the bike and inflate to gently lift the bike up for those first and worst degrees."

Here you are: (see link).

This uses the exhaust to blow it up. I'm sure someone of your skill and experience could knock something up out of an old space hopper and a footpump.....


www.amazon.co.uk/30178-Inflatable-Car-Jack/dp/B000NI4QZO/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_263_t_0? ...

Scooter Cannonball 2012 Bob said :-
At first glance I'm tempted to think flipping heck, that's a long distance on an unsuitable machine but actually those modern large displacement scooters can fair clip on (as I found to my cost one evening trying to keep up with a Vespa GTS300i when I was on my FX650)!

Moto Winch Anyone? Bob said :-
I was out yesterday and dropped the bike three times. There really is no substitute for lack of mass!
The idea of faffing around with ratchet straps and bits of pole in those conditions is laughable.
When it comes to my ideal bike there are three attributes which I want:
1) Power
2) Light Weight
3) Longevity / Reliability
Unfortunately I have come up against the reality that of that list you can have any two attributes, but not all three.
My KLX250 covers 2) & 3), maybe one day I'll get a KTM then I'll have 1) & 2) but I can't for moment buy something I'm expecting to fail sooner rather than later. I trust the KLX mechanically (or at least I do now I've replaced the inadequate automatic camchain tensioner with a manual one).

Hounkirk Moor 1

Epilogue - South Wales 2017 Ren - The Ed said :-
Keith M - don't encourage her!!! I want her to further her career and become a big earner - so I can retire and do the things I want to do. I'm 46 and well past retirement age now.

Moto Winch Anyone? Ren - The Ed said :-
I keep on coming back to the same idea but I can't think as to how it might work. I'm thinking of some sort of fold up bag that you place under the bike and inflate to gently lift the bike up for those first and worst degrees.

The problem is two-fold. 1 - the size of the bag. If the material is going to be strong enough to take the weight of the bike and actually lift the bike enough to complete the lift it's going to be a big bag and therefore cumbersome. Secondly is inflating it. I have considered them cannisters you get to inflate tyres after a puncture repair but it'd be a big cannister to inflate a big bag.

Back to the drawing board...

Epilogue - South Wales 2017 Keith m said :-
Sharon I'm with you. Retire at 50 sounds fantastic. I've been at work since the mid 80's and I'm bored of it now. Don't hate my work it's just I've got better things to do with my life than go to work.

The Trouble With Trouble Rod said :-
Sharon said: "Maybe some of the views held about 250cc motorbikes are based on older bikes and not their modern counterparts."

Hi Sharon, Your 250SL has more power than my Inazuma, I think the Kawasaki has 28bhp and the Suzuki 24bhp, and if you were to ride them back to back you would probably notice the difference. However if you were to ride any of these 250s after riding a 100bhp+ bike your would think that both were running out of steam at motorway speeds. Just saying that it is all relative.
Like the Kawasaki Z250SL by the way, its a good choice of bike if you do not want to take a pillion on a regular basis.

The Trouble With Trouble Rod said :-
Ian Soady said :-
Rod said: "So if a vehicle is joining the motorway at 70mph and you are doing 70mph and you are about to occupy the same piece of tarmac then on a 250 you have to brake, but on a 1000 you can brake or accelerate."

But what is wrong with slowing down? You lose a couple of seconds perhaps. If you're the vehicle already on the motorway and you accelerate there may be someone overtaking you planning to use the space in front of you and you've taken that away from them. If you're the joining vehicle then (especially if what's already in the inside lane is large) there may again be someone you can't see intending to go into the space which you will suddenly occupy.

I agree Ian, there is nothing wrong with slowing down. I was just trying to point out that you do have more options on a bigger bike.


Moto Winch Anyone? Borsuk said :-
Watching the way that pole bends is frightening, despite his reassurances. Visions of the bottom slipping and the bike sliding down his shins.

Moto Winch Anyone? Latchy said :-
I have a 183kg street triple, wet weight, ok so not as light as a 125 but some 250s are heavier than that and I agree that light bikes are more favourable.

The Trouble With Trouble Ian Soady said :-
Sharon said: "Maybe some of the views held about 250cc motorbikes are based on older bikes and not their modern counterparts."

Quite possible. In fact, I think it's much more useful to categorise bikes by weight / power output - in which case my Guzzi would be much closer to your 250 than it would to Ren's 500. And the Arrow would equate to something like a moped........

The Trouble With Trouble Ian Soady said :-
Hi Ross.

In danger of thread divergence, that's a very neat Bantam / Arrow hybrid. Quite a lot of people did similar things, and there are several 4-cylinder Arrows - some in line across the frame, others in a square configuration. I'm not sure how many of them were successful......

The Trouble With Trouble Keith m said :-
As already said everyone has their own opinion on this. But basically if you have more power you will use more power. Perhaps some people feel they need to have a bigger bike with more power to make them feel safer, a little more in hand, so to speak. Small bikes have often been classed as commuter or beginner bikes. They don't know what they are missing. You pay your money and take your choice.


Moto Winch Anyone? Sharon said :-
Oh Sam on a cold wintery day your comment warmed the cockles of my heart.
You wrote - So,coming up 80 and being in no mind to stop riding I looked for something smaller. Enter Sharon! Read her blog on Zen and Keeway bikes,went and looked,liked,bought. It's not quite the same as Zen being a RK125. Oh the joy of a light,manouverable bike THAT I CAN PICK UP! Thanks Sharon you've made an old biker very happy. A different fun to the 550/4 but still fun.

Wow Sam 80 and still riding how fantastic. I am so glad that downsizing in weight meant you kept the joy and fun of riding. I am thrilled that people are discovering and even re-discovering the fun and new options a smaller capacity and lighter bike can bring.
Bigger is not always best for some of us. Indeed due to weight and height some big bikes are not an option at all. It is then we realise that smaller bikes have a host of benefits and light weight is one of their greatest.
Thanks so much for inspiring us all Sam with the knowledge that to keep riding in our 80s could be a fun filled possibility. Happy riding sir. May you have many more smile miles.x

The Trouble With Trouble Sharon said :-
Some great comments and views on this post so thanks everyone for your input so far.
Ross - Thanks for the invite. Team Bat would be happy to take up your offer if we find ourselves in Kent.
Rod - As Ren said interesting point about having two options to either accelerate or slow down on a bigger bike. Although I agree this would be the case on a 125cc I disagree for 70mph on a modern 250cc. Well mine at least.
It has no problem finding more oomph to accelerate at 70mph, it does so easily without even the need to downshift. I know each bike is different but the Kawasaki Z250SL is a torquey bike and one of the reasons I love it so much.
Maybe some of the views held about 250cc motorbikes are based on older bikes and not their modern counterparts.

The Trouble With Trouble CrazyFrog said :-
I'm with Ian on the deliberate laying down of a bike. I've been riding for over 35 years, and I've been lucky enough (or careful enough) to only have had one accident (other than the silly dropping bikes at walking pace etc we all do from time to time).

I could claim that I deliberately laid my bike down to avoid an inevitable collision as someone pulled out from the side of the road to do a 'U' turn about 40 feet in front of me. The truth (and I expect this is the case for most people unless they have spent an awfully long time practicing collision avoidance) however is that in the less than 2 seconds I had to react, I squeezed the front brake lever so hard it's a wonder it didn't snap in half. The front brake locked (no ABS) and off I came, thus hitting the road instead of the car.

I'm sure that if you have time to think 'Oh my, I've got a choice between hitting that car or falling off in a controlled manner' you've got time to brake safely.

just my opinion of course, YMMV.....

The Trouble With Trouble Ross said :-
Hi Ian & Keith

I'm liking the Ariel, I started my biking life on 2 strokes (Yamaha FS1E, Suzuki GT185 & GT250, Yamaha DT175) so have a soft spot for them, despite what the BAT Controller thinks of them! I've hopefully attached a pic' of an oddity that appears regularly at local bike shows and most people walk past without realising what is 'wrong' with it.

"WRT the excavator on the back of the lorry, you mention that there had been several near misses. An observant rider would have seen these and taken the first opportunity to pass where the road was clear."

I don't know how long he was behind the lorry for, but if the lorry was doing 50/60mph and he was at 70/80mph he would not necessarily have seen it pass under another bridge...and I'm not sure many people would have spotted how close the load was to hitting a bridge in the cut and thrust of motorway driving?

Keith, thanks for the extra info' on the incident, I hadn't realised/remembered that the lorry was travelling on the hard shoulder!

Ren, I'm in Kent, so not 'that' close to Shoreham, but not that far 'as the Suzuki Inazuma flies!' If the BAT Team is ever in Kent or nearby I'd like the opportunity to buy them a brew if you have the time! :)

BSA Bantam?

The Trouble With Trouble Ian Soady said :-
I guess I should have modified my initial comment to "it's almost always a crash"........

I still think there must have been some warning signs however.

The Trouble With Trouble Keith m said :-
Sorry to crash the post, but that motorway bridge that came down was something to behold.
A lorry carrying and excavator was traveling on the hard shoulder hit a concrete pedestrian bridge with such force it took it off its mounting. It wasn't a small piece but a span covering three lanes of motorway. It landed on the back of, and crushed,an artic lorry that was passing the low loader. As the whole lot was crashing to the carriage way a motorcyclist decided his best option was to get off and slide underneath. As the bridge had landed on the back of an articulated trailer there was just enough room to slide through. Lucky escape and how nobody else got hurt is pure chance.
Motorway was shut for the weekend as the powers that be decided how to shift several hundred tons of concrete off the carriageway.

Loading A Kawasaki Z 250 SL For Camping Ren - The Ed said :-
I have considered a trailer that's why I'm asking for details in the other post. I know what will happen. The trailer will not be fitted to Sharon's Kwakker but will end up affixed to my 500 instead. Grrrr!

Test Ride Review Of The Suzuki Inazuma 250 - By Ren Withnell Ren - The Ed said :-
NO...PICTURES!!! ARGH!! Rod you're living proof that the world is filled with all kinds of people. I simply cannot imagine taking a trip to Spain on a 250 with a trailer and NOT taking pictures.

At least tell me some details. Towball - universal joint - one wheel or two wheels - swingarm or rear subframe and so on.

The Trouble With Trouble Ian Soady said :-
Hi Ross.

My latest "restoration" (more of a tidy up really) was the Ariel Arrow which some here have been very rude about. I'm a sensitive soul so it will probably not appear in RC...... The link below gives an impression of it.

WRT the excavator on the back of the lorry, you mention that there had been several near misses. An observant rider would have seen these and taken the first opportunity to pass where the road was clear. Unless of course he'd arrived at 90 mph in which case would probably not have had the chance to do much.

I agree entirely with the general conclusions you come to!
www.iansoady.org.uk/Arrow/ ...

The Trouble With Trouble Ren - The Ed said :-
Interesting point Rod - with low power you typically have one choice - the brake, with high power you have 2, accelerate or brake.

I daresay we'd all agree the first thing is to avoid situations where you're forced to make a choice in the first place. But of course we all make mistakes.

Ross you're near Shoreham? My dad lives in Ferring and you have Wemoto nearby :)

The Trouble With Trouble Ian Soady said :-
Rod said: "So if a vehicle is joining the motorway at 70mph and you are doing 70mph and you are about to occupy the same piece of tarmac then on a 250 you have to brake, but on a 1000 you can brake or accelerate."

But what is wrong with slowing down? You lose a couple of seconds perhaps. If you're the vehicle already on the motorway and you accelerate there may be someone overtaking you planning to use the space in front of you and you've taken that away from them. If you're the joining vehicle then (especially if what's already in the inside lane is large) there may again be someone you can't see intending to go into the space which you will suddenly occupy.

It's very rare that the slip road isn't long enough and with enough visibility to match speeds even if it does require easing off slightly.

Test Ride Review Of The Suzuki Inazuma 250 - By Ren Withnell Ross said :-
Hi rod

Congratulations on the trip to Spain and nice to hear an Inazuma was up to that sort of journey. I'm very happy with my 'naked' Inazuma but don't have the time/will to take on such adventures. I just make do with local rides and the odd day trip and find the little Suzuki is so easy to ride and small enough for me to manage it's weight with my creaky old joints!

The Trouble With Trouble Ross said :-
Hi Ian

"It would be interesting to know the circumstances. Lorries hitting bridges don't do so out of the blue..."

If I Remember correctly, an excavator on the back of the HGV hadn't been stowed correctly and the boom was too high. He'd passed under a few road bridges with 'just' enough clearance but a pedestrian bridge with a design that was lower at the sides of the road than the centre was his undoing...some of the bridge came down too!

"There are of course unpredictable events - the aircraft falling out of the sky when involved in an air show is one such"

Shoreham? That wasn't far from me either! :-/

"I'm not trying to be holier than thou and I have made (and continue to make) mistakes and exhibit poor judgment."

Absolutely, we all do...When I have an 'oh, shit!' moment, whether in the car or on the bike, I always try and review it to try and work out what I could or should have done to not be in that situation, even if it wasn't my 'fault'. Usually the answer is I should have been going slower or given the other vehicle more space!

(PS are we going to see any more of your bikes in Real Classic magazine again soon?)

The Trouble With Trouble Rod said :-
Changing from bigger bikes to a 250 I do find that I ride more defensive than before. I think that it is the fact that when you are at full traffic speed you only have one option (to brake) rather than two options (brake or accelerate). So if a vehicle is joining the motorway at 70mph and you are doing 70mph and you are about to occupy the same piece of tarmac then on a 250 you have to brake, but on a 1000 you can brake or accelerate.
Just one scenario where more power may get you out of trouble!!
You are travelling at about 60mph and come up behind a boy racer with the big bore pipe ect. You wait for a piece of road where it is safe to overtake and go for the overtake. When you move out to overtake the boy racer decides to give you a race and puts his foot down. On a bigger bike you would not even notice that they had put their foot down, you would have gone, but on a 250 you have a potential problem.
Generally I agree that in practice you ride to your, and the bikes capabilities.

Loading A Kawasaki Z 250 SL For Camping rod said :-
Have you considered a trailer for all of the camping gear?
You can also lock and leave the bike and trailer parked up, and not worry about the theft of all your gear!

Test Ride Review Of The Suzuki Inazuma 250 - By Ren Withnell rod said :-
Hi Ren,
Its a Suzuki Inazuma GW250F.
Sorry I do not have any pictures, and I have taken the towbar of the bike, as I am not using the bike for camping trips through the winter. I know that most people think you need a Goldwing to pull a trailer, but my trailer weighs 31kg without a load, so even with all of the camping gear tools ect probably weighs no more than 90kgs. That is about the same as a pillion passenger. If anyone knows the climb up from San Sebastian to Pamplona in Spain, I did the whole climb in top gear at around 45 - 55mph (although the bike would have been happier twice on the climb in 5th gear) I just left it in top gear to prove a point to myself.

The Trouble With Trouble Ian Soady said :-
Hi Ross.

It would be interesting to know the circumstances. Lorries hitting bridges don't do so out of the blue. There is almost always some warning - it's weaving about, crossing white lines, whatever - although I accept I don't know the detail of this specific case.

There are of course unpredictable events - the aircraft falling out of the sky when involved in an air show is one such, Ren's collision with another bike another. But most signal themselves.

One thing I always do on motorways is to ensure I'm not part of a "three abreast" (or even four where we now have 4 lane running) scenario, and make sure that I minimise the time I'm beside another vehicle as that's the time of greatest risk.

I'm not trying to be holier than thou and I have made (and continue to make) mistakes and exhibit poor judgment. But fortunately in my 50+ years of riding and driving I have never had a car crash of any description or a serious bike crash.

I totally agree that you need to be defensive but it goes further than that - just think about where the risks are, and consider what actions you can take to minimise them. I hate to say it but often that comes down to slowing down a bit......

The problem with having "a bit in hand" with the misjudged overtake is that if you've still misjudged it the resulting crash is far worse than it otherwise would be (although a head-on with another vehicle at open road speeds will inevitably end badly).

Moto Winch Anyone? Ren - The Ed said :-
Ah now you've got me thinking Bob. The worst part of a bike lift is probably the first 45-55 degrees. Our bodies seem to be shaped such that we're at our weakest when lifting from the ground. The idea of a couple of straps to get things going sounds very helpful - and very easy to carry.

I shall experiment - good call.

Yes of course the best thing would be to have a bicycle. However we motorcyclists just insist that there's an engine in there. It's all about compromise I suppose.

Moto Winch Anyone? Bob said :-
I have used that Youtube technique successfully on a Vstrom 650 and XT660 and a TDM850 (great lump of a thing), but I made some loop straps from old ratchet straps. Each loop was about 12" in length. One loop went around the grab rail and the other round the handlebar. I placed my hands through the loops and gripped them against my wrist. I found that this got around the problem of the initial part of the lift. I have long legs and found that even squatted fully I still could reach down to the handlebar.
By standing facing away from the bike with the strap loops I could effectively perform a power lift from a partial squat, using just my legs. When the bike was up part way I leant back until my backside found the saddle, then I completed the walking-backwards-lift as shown in the video.
All in though, less wieght is the way.

Moto Winch Anyone? Ren - The Ed said :-
I have been waiting for the "how to pick up your motorcycle" video. Sharon and I have seen countless such guides as to how to lift your motorcycle but they just don't work in the real world. Those times when Sharon or I have dropped our bikes were not on a smooth flat surface in a warm dry workshop. They are typically down a narrow lane on an incline on a wet loose surface. We're not wearing jeans and a t-shirt we're in full bike kit. We're not calm and collected we're flustered, shocked, annoyed and frustrated.

Even when we deliberately laid Sharon's 125 down to see if she could use this common technique as shown in the videos Sharon could not lift the 125. She did manage it with the typical grab the bars and heave method though.

As stated in the post I do think this kind of lift or something similar is an option, a choice, an idea that will be suitable for some.

The Trouble With Trouble Ross said :-
Sharon said...

“Because we use our judgement and we will potentially push, if we are that way inclined, which ever bike we are on at the time to the max. “

Whilst I agree with where you're coming from on this, I feel you've possibly over-simplified it a bit. I don't think many people max-out modern litre plus sportsbikes on the road (but I'm sure a tiny minority do, and lots more claim they do!) because they are just so bloody fast! A big, powerful bike can give you more margin for error if you make a misjudgement or the situation unexpectedly changes...and most people wouldn't take the possibly more prudent approach of backing off and pulling back in behind the vehicle they are overtaking because of ego or over-confidence in their own abilities, but with plenty in hand you 'can' still make the pass!

Ian Soady said...

“... the same mythical category as "laying the bike down to avoid a crash" (errrr, that is a crash)...”

I've usually heard it referred to as “laying the bike down to avoid a bigger/more serious crash” which possibly makes more sense in some circumstances. For example, an accident on a motorway near me a year or so ago involving a motorcyclist “laying his bike down” to avoid a lorry that was busy having an accident with a bridge. Apparently his choice was be decapitated by the trailer or “lay the bike down” and slide clear of the worst of it (he didn't get away unharmed...broken ribs, punctured lung, broken ankle and lots of abrasions!).

It's all very well bullshitting in front of your mates at the local biker cafe, but I do wonder how many would have the presence of mind to get off their bike like that in a crash situation...ride defensive and hope not to put it to the test, eh!

Just a few of my thoughts on the subject, I hope I haven't misquoted or misrepresented anything anybody has said, keep up the good work Sharon and Ren, and the regular contributors to the site, it's always an interesting and thought provoking read here! :)


Moto Winch Anyone? Ian Soady said :-
I agree completely about lighter bikes. I have 10 years or so to go before I get to Sam's age but realised a few years ago that the weight and bulk of my then bike (the Tiger 955i) was actually putting me off riding it. No problem once on the open road but mucking about getting it out of the garage, parking, walking speed traffic etc were all harder work than I wanted. I haven't yet progressed to a 125 but can recognise it will come.

The crane thing is just daft. Many years ago when I rode in pre-65 trials (I hesitate to say competed) I dropped the Enfield on a muddy track and ended up with it on top of me trapping my leg underneath. I had to wait till another competitor turned up to lift it off me. Fortunately I hadn't missed the route or might still be there to this day. Also fortunately it fell on the left hand side so it wasn't a red hot exhaust pipe pinning me down......

BTW there's an excellent youtube video........
www.youtube.com/watch?v=84YfDGKA4Og ...

Moto Winch Anyone? Sam said :-
The day of reckoning came when I dropped the Honda 550/4 on the drive and realised I couldn't pick it up. So,coming up 80 and being in no mind to stop riding I looked for something smaller. Enter Sharon! Read her blog on Zen and Keeway bikes,went and looked,liked,bought. It's not quite the same as Zen being a RK125. Oh the joy of a light,manouverable bike THAT I CAN PICK UP! Thanks Sharon you've made an old biker very happy. A different fun to the 550/4 but still fun.

The Trouble With Trouble Sharon said :-
I wonder if we will ever manage to have a culture where we are applauded by our mates for our safety rather than our speed or stunts. The pressure to be fast is still enormous. Bigger and faster bikes are always coming out and are usually very popular. Many people are advised on passing their test not to get anything smaller than a 600cc. As in this post they are told they are not as safe as bigger bikes or they will bore you. I was given this advice myself. Lucky for me I am old enough and small enough to choose what suited me not anyone else. I am still not bored but I think boredom has more to with the person themselves.

As Epicurus said - Nothing is enough for the man to whom enough is too little.

Moto Winch Anyone? Bob said :-
As an aside I'm realising more and more the benefits of a light bike, manouverability in traffic, man-handling it around the garage, but mainly it's wet weather riding. I've noticed that the difference between the speed I can maintain in the wet and in the dry is much less than it was on my bigger bikes. The light weight of the KLX means the tyres have less work to do when cornering.

Moto Winch Anyone? Bob said :-
Yes I did lift that FX650 (not an SLR) but it was hard to do, that moto winch would have just powered itself into the mud!
The reason I've gone down to a 250cc is precisley because I was finding the bigger bikes difficult to lift (knackered disc in lower back).
In Japan I think they used to have a rule that you had to be able to pick up your motorcycle and that's what lead to the large 400cc sector, those bikes being big enough for long distances whilst light enough to pick up.
I see those Africa Twins are ~240KG, absolutely ridiculous! That's like riding my KLX250 with a 16 stone man sitting on the pillion!

The Trouble With Trouble Ian Soady said :-
The only bike I've ever had with more than 50 bhp or so was the 955i Tiger with 105. While I loved the effortless way it accelerated (well past the ton if not paying attention) I never actually used anything like the power available in "real life". And of course with the extra power came extra bulk and weight.

I found the power of my Norton Commando at about 50 bhp just right - an easily attainable 80 mph, good acceleration, and a flexible engine only needing 4 speeds. The Guzzi is similar although a bit more "top endy". The Honda 4 had similar power output but far too peaky for me.

I much prefer a slightly larger engine with flexibility to a highly tuned smaller one.

125 On-Off Roaders? Ren - The Ed said :-
103mpg Bob?! Pah - the CBF gives me 130-140. I'm smaller than you though and the CBF is fool injected.

The Trouble With Trouble Ren - The Ed said :-
Power is a funny thing. I do enjoy stepping onto the 500 and having that "ooomph" to play with - and the 500 is only(?) 47bhp. The Fazer had 95bhp and apart from the remote road in Scotland I'd say 45 of those horses were wasted. On the occasions I called for all the power it left me concerned for both my licence and my wellbeing. To be honest the 47 horses in the 500 also cause the same concerns.

My 125 is just fine. There are times when it is frustrating when loaded up with camping kit and going uphill in 3rd at max revs and 35mph I do yearn for a little more. I'm thinking Bob and Sharon are about right with 250, enough to always reach the speed limits and keep with the traffic, not enough to encourage stupidity.

I think 400-500 in a soft tune for grunt rather than performance is best if you're two up with kit.

Managing Expectations Ren - The Ed said :-
Squatty Potty - I like that Borsuk.

Now there's a thing. As a 46 year old bloke yes I can still squat a little but the knee that was knackered in the crash is not a happy bunny. What I can't imagine is how a 85 year old person with arthritis and weakened muscles goes on?

Test Ride Review Of The Suzuki Inazuma 250 - By Ren Withnell Ren - The Ed said :-
Rod - when you say 250f do you mean CBF250 or some other 250? I need to know! Also I think we all need to see an image of your "rig". I'm trying to imagine twoing with a 250 - it sounds perfect.

Test Ride Review Of The Suzuki Inazuma 250 - By Ren Withnell rod said :-
just been down to Spain on my 250f towing a small trailer with camping gear.
Full trip was over 2000 miles and one day I covered 714 miles. I averaged over 80mpg and at one fill up did 92mpg. I have owned lots of different bikes, including three of 1000cc. I am now 62 years old and bigger bikes are great when you are riding them, but with age they seem to get heavier when pushing them around. I intend keeping the Inazuma for many years.

Managing Expectations Borsuk said :-
Squatty Potties as the wife called them when we were in China. Murder on the knees and if your a read in the loo type of person a great disappointment.



Older Items
image used for spacing
Valid HTML?

Admin
Classifieds